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Spanish Open dictionary by Felipe Lorenzo del Río



Felipe Lorenzo del Río
  2763

  Value Position Position 8 8 Accepted meanings 2763 8 Obtained votes 26 13 Votes by meaning 0.01 21 Inquiries 27438 8 Queries by meaning 10 21 Feed + Pdf

"Statistics updated on 11/19/2019 11:41:20 AM"




de la ceca a la meca
  1

Adverbial lousin. From here to there, from one place to another. There are many explanations about the origin of the expression. One alludes to the mint being the material, by the place where currency is minted and Mecca the spiritual, for being a place of religious pilgrimage. Others say of Mint in Mecca. Cervantes puts in Sancho's mouth this expression, with lowercase, in the cap. 18 of the first part : " . . . . leaving us from mint to mecca and from souk to colodra, as they say."

  
pina
  1

In the alistana asturleonesa speech is a wedge of iron or wood that was encrusted with hammers under the fence of the plow. This also called the widest wedge of iron or wood used to crack the holm oak or holm logs to make streaks that burned in the light during the winter. Likewise, the alistanos said pina or pinaza to the different segments of the circumference of the carriage wheel, made of holm oak, on which the iron rim incandescent heated in the forge was attached.

  
el penseque y el creique
  1

The popular saying is that penseque and creique are brothers of the tonteque. Also said Don Penseque and Don Creique or San Penseque or San Creique are cousins of Don Tonteque or San Tonteque. Others instead of fooling around use neatness or burreque. The saying gives us the excuse of the mistake produced by carelessness or lack of reflection.

  
cozarse
  1

In my asturlion land this verb is used in its pronominal form with the meaning of rubbing some part of the body against a pole, a tree or a wall to sweep. It is said mostly of animals. When the yoke cows are released, they usually are charged against a pole or whatever in the testimonial.

  
cosmic crisp
  1

In English, cosmic crunch. Variety of apple, daughter by honeycrisp pollination and enterprice performed by researchers from the University of Washington after twenty years of work, intense red with white-yellow lentila, which might recall a starry cosmos, and sweet, crunchy white meat. They say it's going to be America's queen apple for years to come. The look is beautiful.

  
teónimo
  1

From Greek theos, god and onoma onkills, name. Proper name of a god. Paleographic studies of thetheonyms have been useful for understanding the connections of primitive languages such as Indo-European languages.

  
teocrio
  2

Ornamental shrub of green-grey leaves very common in the gardens of Madrid, which they also call olivilla, olivera, bitter sage, Andalusian Trojan, large Trojan ( teucrium fruticans). Its name may derive from the Teucros or Trojans, whose first king was called Teucro, son of the River Escamandro and the nymph Ida.

  
alienación
  1

From Latin alienus, alien, another than me. Alienation. Action and effect of alienating . This action regarding only the individual field denotes the situation in which we lose consciousness of our personal identity, our self, we go crazy, we lose our head, we no longer have the center in consciousness. Another issue is whether we refer to the collective field as legal, social, worker, citizens or political persons. Here alienation, which has studied Marxism very well, destroys our collective consciousness, our social and solidarity self.

  
alienación política
  2

Marxism and its various subsequent neos have brilliantly described this and the other alienations that impede human self-realization personally and collectively. In this case the alienating cause is in the institutions and the various powers of the state that are in the service of the current order. We influence the executive and legislative branches by voting; not so much in the judiciary. Although the other powers already ensure that this influence is as minimal as possible.

  
esquisto
  2

From Greek schistos, cleft, separated. Metamorphic rock of laminar structure formed inside the earth over the years mainly by the action of temperature and pressure. For my Alistan land asturleones predominate slate shale with blackish, ochre or brown-gray tones with which they make the walls of the houses.

  
llicorella
  3

In Catalan, slate, homogeneous and laminated metamorphic rock, abundant in some areas of the Pyrenees and on the pronounced slopes of Priorat tarraconense where the Grenache and Carignan grape grows.

  
cucurril
  3

Mushroom of my asturlions land which mycologists call macrolepiota procera. People give you many names like matacandil, matacandelas, sunshade, switch, pigeon, snake mushroom, galamperna, cogomelo, wolf bread, drum mace and many others.

  
arte cisoria
  3

Didactic work of Enrique de Aragón, Marquis of Villena, nephew of Henry III of Castile, the mourning. Work written in the fifteenth century and subtitled treatise on the art of cutting the knife. From the Latin verb dropped -is -ere cecidi caesum , hurtir , cut . As Alberto points out, it is a set of rules, written in the fifteenth century, to carve the roadwith the knife.

  
hidrolato
  2

Technical term . Floral water obtained in steam distillation of the essential oils of a plant such as rosemary, splendour, thyme, heart, mint, basil, citronella, chamomile or marigold. It derives from the Greek hydor hydatos, water and French lait, from Latin lac lactis, milk, for its milky appearance in the traditional distillations of the French to obtain colonies and perfumes.

  
magostu
  4

Magostu : Feast of the chestnut of my land with Celtic magic resonances. In the asturleones ature zone they also call him magosto, magosta, magéestu , amagoestu, magusto. It is also celebrated in Galicia, Cantabria, Extremadura, where they call it chaquetía, chiquitía, calvochá, carbochá or calbotes and the north of Portugal. In the Basque Country they call it gaztainerre or gaztanarre. The name may derive from the Latin magnus ustus, great fire, or magum ustum, magic fire. Around the feast of the saints it is customary for my land at sunset to roast chestnuts and drink wine around a great fire, while stories are told in an atmosphere of collective jolgorio. as José María Pereda also narrates in The Taste of the Tender.

  
cacaforra
  2

Some days I go to my asturlions. They are fast round trips in an instant when I gather everything and also words. Autumn rains have suggested this. That's what my countrymen call the bejines or wolf farts. They are round fungi the size of an egg or even larger, white or white, which usually appear in autumn or spring rains. Some are edible when their interior is white and consistent, although they do not have great culinary value. Its scientific name is lycoperdon (lykos, wolf and pardon, fart) with dozens of different species.

  
pinjante
  2

To paint, pender, be hung. It is said of ornaments or objects of gold, silver or other valuable items that wear earrings. In architecture it is said mainly of the ornamental motifs that hang from the roofs, arches or vaults, as happens in the flamboyant Gothic.

  
bachillerato
  2

From Latin baccalaureatus, laureado with berry, for in the Middle Ages and remembering the Greek champions of the Olympics, it was crowned with laurel branches full of black berries to which they finished their first-grade studies at universities. It was Pope Gregory IX in the 13th century who distinguished the bachelor,graduate and doctoral degrees.

  
avunculado
  2

Social system compatible with matriarchy, researched by French anthropologist Lévi Strauss in primitive cultures. Term associated with avúnculus (maternal uncle), diminutive of avus (grandfather), key figure in socioeconomic relations, authority, power and property in this system. Epigraphic archaeological findings of pre-Roman Hispanic cultures in the north of the peninsular allow us to think about the existence of this organizational system.

  
biércol
  2

One of the many names of the heather to which in my land near the Montes prefer to say urz, calluna vulgaris, of the Ericaceae family, which endures the drought well because it performs photosynthesis C4 . Its very hard wood has been used in craftsmanship to make bagpipes, pipes or other objects and its root to make charcoal.

  




       


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