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Spanish Open dictionary by Felipe Lorenzo del Río



Felipe Lorenzo del Río
  3894

  Value Position Position 9 9 Accepted meanings 3894 9 Obtained votes 132 9 Votes by meaning 0.03 20 Inquiries 126547 8 Queries by meaning 32 20 Feed + Pdf

"Statistics updated on 7/15/2024 11:58:41 AM"




de las musas al teatro
  3

Well, more than a hundred in twenty-four hours / passed from the muses to the theater, wrote Lope de Vega hyperbolically about his comedies. The entrenched expression came to mean over time, to move from theory to practice, from ideas to action.

  
de las musas al teatro
  3

Well, more than a hundred in twenty-four hours / passed from the muses to the theater, wrote Lope de Vega hyperbolically about his comedies. The entrenched expression came to mean over time, to move from theory to practice, from ideas to action.

  
tastevin
  7

Gallicism. Although the term wine from France is really an Anglogallic hybrid of taster, taster and vin. Silver, tin or glass wine tasting utensil, formerly copper, wood or ceramic. It is shaped like a wide, shallow shell or cup with bulges or dents to better see the color tones or turbidity of the wine.

  
cianómetro
  9

From the Greek kuanos, blue and metron, measure. Instrument to measure the blue of the sky created by the eighteenth-century Swiss mountaineer and geologist Horace Benedict de Saussure with 52 shades of blue from white to black. He measured at the top of the Alpine Montblanc the 39th degree of his scale. Years later, in the 19th century, the German polymath Alexander von Humbold recorded the 46th degree of blue on the summit of Chimborazo in the Andes. And it is that when you go up in height the blue darkens.

  
borjamari
  10

Hypocoristic by Borja María. Cayetano, prototype of the posh Spaniard from the Madrid neighborhood of Salamanca, young, right-wing, boasting of having money and belonging to the upper class.

  
eslinga
  9

Anglicism. De to sling , to throw . In the line of the companions, rope, rope or ribbon that can be made of steel, vegetable or artificial fibers with a hook or loop at one of its ends, used for different purposes such as lifting large weights, dragging vehicles or securing the body of mountaineers to prevent falls

  
endozoocoria
  9

From the Greek endo, within, zoon, animal, and chore, region (dispersion). A scientific term that describes a type of zoochory: dispersal of plant seeds through animals that eat them and then poop them. The pigeons, magpies and Argentine parrots of the neighborhood eat the olives and berries of the yew trees and thus weaken the hard envelope of the seeds that then take root if conditions are favorable.

  
restaurante
  7

Place where food and drinks are served and consumed. The Dictionary also tells us restaurant, inn, tavern, dining room and in the monastic areas refectory. This unrecognized Gallicism seems to have its origin in the pre-revolutionary Paris of the eighteenth century. A Parisian innkeeper put this sign with biblical resonances at the entrance of his premises: Venite ad me vos qui stomacho laboratis et ego restaurabo vos. Come to me, all you hungry, and I will make you recover

  
vivificación de los gorriones
  10

The apocryphal Gospel of the infancy of Thomas, written around the fourth century, tells us that it was the first miracle that Christ performed at the age of five. He played in Nazareth in a stream making little birds out of mud. It was Saturday. Another boy reproached him that this could not be done on the Sabbath and accused him before his father, that he should be a Pharisee. When the father of the child arrives with the same nonsense, Jesus addressed the little birds and said to them: "Fly!" And the sparrows flew away.

  
palleter
  8

Pajero in Valencian, straw seller. From the Latin palea which in Spanish gave straw and in Valencian palla , in diminutive palleta . The palleter was the nickname given by the Valencians for his trade to Vicente Domenech, who one day in May 1808 declared war on the French by climbing on a chair in the market square and haranguing his countrymen.

  
lavara
  9

Of course here we have a verb form, the first and third person singular of the imperfect past tense of the subjunctive of the verb to wash, as our Open Dictionary tells us. But with a capital letter it is something else. That was the name of a guerrilla fighter from my land belonging to the Asturian tribe of the Zoelas, who fought, according to legend, sometimes even with Viriathus against the Romans in the second century BC. C . They called her the Captain. I was born in a town in Alcañices, the capital of my land of Alista.

  
txoriburu
  8

Basque insult : A plover's head, a hollow head, a light head, an individual with little judgment, not very intelligent, lelo, botarate, tarambana, locatis, trincapiñones.

  
babalore
  11

Basque expletive, not very offensive to describe a bland and simple person: bean flower. In Spanish we would say: alma de cántaro , pobre infeliz , pasmao , alelao , bobalicón , inocente . It can also have a positive meaning when referring to children: beautiful, beautiful, nice.

  
muyirona
  10

Alistanismo : Mujerona, mythical character of our childhood. In the post-war period, they tried to scare and correct the mischief of children with: ¡Que viene la muyirona! In our childhood imagination this character was a large woman dressed in black, with a lot of jet black hair that always covered her face, aggressive, fearful and surely ugly, who stole children and we did not know what she was doing with them.

  
merichane
  8

The Greeks called Cleopatra this way because of her fellator love art. They say that it meant "mouth of ten thousand men", "open mouth". And it is true that the Greek verb chaino means to open the mouth. Among some ancient priestesses, fellatio was common, to which they gave a sacred meaning. It is also true that Cleopatra was not a priestess but an expert felatrix.

  
llurigón
  11

Also whimper, water rat, arvicola sapidus or terrestris, of which Delibes spoke in his novel Las Ratas and Blasco Ibáñez in Cañas y Barro. Asturian alistano probably derived from the Latin lauricus, diminutive of laurex lauricis , gazapillo , rabbit breeding, related to the Catalan llorigó and the Mirandese trasmontano lorga , lurga , lura . The rainforests are currently protected but are hardly visible due to the pollution of the waters of our rivers.

  
ondón
  8

In my land, they call the hole in the needle that way. Perhaps also a profound one considering that Alistano is a spoken and barely written dialect. And the priest said in his sermon: "It is easier for a camel to pass through the undong of a needle than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven." And since the Alistanos have always been very religious, they have always been poor. Now they are waking up.

  
formarse troya
  9

Around here, in the peninsula, we say to form or better, to get involved in the Trojan War, in allusion to the Trojan War of classical Greece, to describe a mess, a tumult, a revolt, a fight, an argument or a mess usually without going to arms

  
pancipelaos
  9

Derogatory name for the Bornichos, inhabitants of Bornos, a municipality of almost eight thousand inhabitants in Cadiz. Their white-studded neighbours in Villamartín once accused them of stealing from the landowners' estates by crawling under the fences.

  
estar sembrao
  6

Colloquial verbal locution of to be sown, to be witty or witty, as the Open Dictionary tells us, to be inspired or funny in the way of expressing oneself or acting. The tendency to suppress the intervocalic d at the end of some participles, especially those in -ado, is becoming more and more general, although the RAE scolds us for its careless and even vulgar use.